Projects

Tasks awaiting volunteers

Transpolitica invites political thinkers, futurists, and transhumanist supporters from around the world to become involved in one or more of the projects listed below.

By preference, we encourage participation in the projects listed as “high priority”. Note: projects are placed in this category depending on:

  • Feedback from the individual politicians that Transpolitica is seeking to support
  • The views expressed by Transpolitica consultants and researchers

High priority projects in progress

  • Forthcoming new book “Transpolitica: Transcending Politics”
  • The H+Pedia initiative
    • The primary purpose of H+Pedia is to spread accurate, accessible, non-sensational information about transhumanism and futurism among the general public
    • The Transpolitica angle for H+Pedia is to develop, as part of H+Pedia, a curated resource library of material that supports Transpolitica policies

Other high priority projects (not started yet, or stalled)

  • How should Transpolitica respond to the proposed agreement by scientists not to modify the DNA of human reproductive cells?
  • Should Transpolitica have supported the Saatchi Bill for “Responsible Medical Innovation?” See here for a contrary viewpoint
  • Formulate an answer the question “What does Transpolitica think about the Leveson review of the culture and ethics of the British media?”
  • Create a white paper explaining to politicians the concept of the longevity dividend
    • Document in process here
  • Provide more details of a roadmap towards implementation of Universal Basic Income (or similar social contract)
    • Document in process here
  • Clarify the ways in which online activism can have the biggest positive effect (rather than simply being so-called “slacktivism“)
  • Develop “sound bites” and memes that could become viral, supporting Transpolitica policies
  • Create engaging videos about Transpolitica

Other important projects

  • Suggest improvements to the Transpolitica Manifesto
  • Suggest improvements to the Transpolitica FAQ
  • Build bridges between Transpolitica and organizations that could potentially be important partners
  • Prepare assessments of the published manifestos of existing political parties, as compared to the Transpolitica policies
  • Identify electoral candidates from existing political parties who appear likely to be sympathetic to Transpolitica policies, ahead of finding projects with common cause
  • Identify sympathetic journalists, and deepen relations with them
  • Establish a programme management system that helps coordinate volunteers and tasks.

Volunteering to work on a particular task

For small amounts of work, JFDI. Be bold.

For potential larger amounts of work, start by posting a short proposal on the Transpolitica mailing group. This should help avoid misunderstanding or unnecessary duplication of effort.

Alternatively, send an email to the Transpolitica programme management team.

Mail discussion group

The mailing group https://groups.google.com/forum/#!forum/transpolitica exists to to coordinate planning and execution of Transpolitica projects. To join the group, visit this page, and send a subscription request.

Recent Posts

Exuberance and scarcity: chapter ready for review

FiPo cover hires

A new chapter of the forthcoming book “Transcending Politics” has been released for review comments by Transpolitica supporters.

The chapter is entitled “Exuberance and scarcity“. You can get an idea of the content covered by the list of its section headings:

  • Lost fortunes over the centuries
  • Overconfidence over the centuries
  • From slow change to fast change
  • Financial clouds gathering again
  • Economic maximisation is not enough
  • Animal spirits
  • A technoprogressive future for money
  • Towards sustainable abundance
  • Constancy amidst change

Here’s how the chapter starts (in its current version):

Let’s set aside for the time being the subject of the previous chapter, namely the threat of an environmental meltdown triggered by reckless human activity. Instead, to start this chapter, let’s consider a different kind of meltdown, in which financial systems cease working around the world.

In such a scenario, ordinary citizens might try to withdraw cash from bank teller machines, sometime in the next few years, only to find they’ve all stopped working. The funds in savings accounts may be significantly reduced overnight. Payment requests using credit cards may be declined, causing chaos in shops and restaurants. In an atmosphere of profound uncertainty, corporations will avoid taking risks. Business contracts will be cancelled, with growing numbers of employees being made redundant. Supermarket shelves will become bare. Populist politicians and newspapers will be quick to blame bankers, businessmen, overseas cabals, the so-called “elites”, reds-under-the-bed, or whoever. Tempers everywhere will flare. Soon, people will be trying to take matters into their own hands. The few “survivalists” who have been able to hoard scarce resources will find their stashes under attack. It won’t be long until law and order breaks down.

That’s a possible disturbing future which has echoes in many past upheavals. History bears witness to a long series of financial crashes, each ugly in their own way. Simpler times saw simpler kinds of crashes, but the effects were still often catastrophic for the individuals involved.

In this chapter, I’ll explore the likely effect on future financial stability from the trend that underpins all the others discussed in this book, namely the acceleration of technological innovation. Should that acceleration make us more apprehensive about forthcoming financial crises? Or will it instead diminish the importance of money? Indeed, if economics is the study of the allocation of scarce resources, and accelerating technology delivers a sustainable abundance of all the basic necessities of life, where will that leave economics? Will the displacement of scarcity by abundance transform the so-called “dismal science” (economics) into an unnecessary science?

To give my answer in advance: that’s not going to happen any time soon, contrary to the apparent expectation of various techno-utopians. Technological innovation, by itself, isn’t going to free society from the risk of financial meltdowns. Instead, we’re going to need better politics: technoprogressive politics…

As with all the other chapters released so far, Google Doc copies of the latest version can be reached from this page on the Transpolitica website. Google Docs makes it easy for people to raise comments, suggest modifications to the text, and (for reviewers who log into a Google account) to see comments raised by other reviewers.

Comments are particularly welcome from reviewers where they point out mistakes, pieces of text where the meaning is unclear, or key considerations that seem to have been neglected.

Drafts of eight of the envisaged 13 chapters have now been completed. Over the month of August, it is hoped that at least one more chapter will be completed – and that the earlier chapters will be revised in the light of review comments that have already been received.

  1. Championing the Future Leave a reply
  2. Technology is eating politics Leave a reply
  3. Transpolitica 2016 – The questions asked 1 Reply
  4. Transpolitica 2016 – The best questions Leave a reply
  5. Transpolitica 2016 – Previews Leave a reply
  6. Project for a Progressive Ethics 13 Replies
  7. Transpolitica 2016 – Schedule Leave a reply
  8. Transpolitica 2016 – call for submissions Leave a reply
  9. Flawed humanity, flawed politics Leave a reply