Envisioning Politics 2.0

Available for purchase and download (from 30th June 2015)

Envisioning Politics 2.0Table of contents

  1. Zoltan Istvan’s “Teleological Egocentric Functionalism”: a libertarian philosophical basis for “Transhumanist” politics – by Roland Benedikter, Katja Siepmann, and Annabella McIntosh
  2. Four political futures: which will you choose? – by David W Wood
  3. How do governments add value to society? – by Bruce Lloyd
  4. The benefits of digital democracy – by Walter L.S. Burrough and Kay Firth-Butterfield
  5. Cyborgization: a possible solution to errors in human decision making – by Dana Edwards and Alexander J Karran
  6. Of mind and money: post-scarcity economics and human nature – by Stuart Mason Dambrot
  7. Voluntary basic incomes in a reputation economy – by Michael Hrenka
  8. Specifications: an engineer’s approach to upgrading politics – by René Milan
  9. Extended longevity: an argument for increased social commitment – by MH Wake
  10. Longevity, artificial intelligence and existential risks: opportunities and dangers – by Didier Coeurnelle
  11. Prolegomena to any future transhumanist politics – by Steve Fuller

About this book

The single most important task of the next ten years is to find better ways of cooperating. In an age of unprecedented crowds – both online and offline – the global human community urgently needs social mechanisms that will encourage the wisdom of crowds rather than the folly of crowds.

Our existing methods of mutual coordination seem to produce more strife than harmony these days. We’re struggling to cope with ever larger tensions and disruptions on the shrinking world stage. The nation state, the multinational business firm, the free market, the non-governmental organisation, the various international bodies of global coordination set up after the Second World War – all find themselves deeply challenged by the myriad fast-evolving overlapping waves of stress of the early twenty-first century.

We’re facing tragedies of the commons writ larger than ever before. The actions that make good sense to smaller groups often add up, perversely, to disastrous outcomes for the larger community. But attempts to coordinate actions to avoid such tragedies are falling foul of numerous deep-seated conflicts of interest.

Politics 1.0 has taken us a long way. But the multidimensional, intersecting nature of present-day issues and opportunities requires a new calibre of politics. Anticpating that new calibre of politics is the central purpose of the think tank Transpolitica which has published this volume.

The essays in this book provide visions of what Politics 2.0 might look like. They express the thoughts, hopes, and fears from a diverse mix of futurists, political thinkers, academics, and think-tank members. They explore various ways in which new technology might enable improved politics (analogous to the way in which technology enabled the emergence of a collaborative “Web 2.0” with community intelligence, superseding the top-down “Web 1.0”):

  • Relevant expert knowledge being quickly brought to vexed questions of subsidies, regulations, standards, and so on – rather than politicians being out of their depths
  • Automated fact-checking taking place in real-time, rather than mistakes and errant claims being allowed to influence political discussion for too long
  • Humans improving their own cognitive skills, as part of a process we can call cyborgization
  • External artificial intelligence augmenting the decision-making capabilities of humans
  • The insights of the transhumanist movement, which boldly upholds the possibility of a profound social transformation alongside human physical and mental enhancements.

Cover design

The book cover is based on a design by Alberto Rizzoli.

Recent Posts

Tools for better politics?

Which solutions most deserve mention, in a list of “tools for better politics”?

Tools for better politics

As I’m reflecting on comments from reviewers of the draft chapters of the forthcoming book Transcending Politics, I’ve reached the view that I should add a new section, towards the end of the book, entitled “Tools well worth watching”.

This will fit well into Chapter 14, “Afterword”, which already contains a similarly-themed section “Communities well worth joining”.

If you have any suggestions or comments, either leave them in the Google Doc for Chapter 14, or as replies to this blogpost.

Ideally the list will include tools applicable to one or more of the systems described below (this is an extract from Chapter 1).

  • Transparency systems, so that the activity of public organisations and decisions are visible, and can be judged more easily and accurately
  • Fact-checking systems to determine more quickly and clearly, via an online lookup, if some information is misleading, deceptive, biased, or in any other way suspect or substandard
  • Thinking training systems to help everyone understand and routinely practice the skills of critical thinking, hypothesis formulation and testing, and independent evaluation of sources
  • Accountability systems to hold people and organisations to account whenever they pass on damaging misinformation – similar to how codes of conduct already operate in the fields of advertising and investment communications
  • Bridging systems to encourage people with strong disagreements to nevertheless explore and appreciate each other’s points of view, so that shared values can be identified and a constructive dialog established
  • Educational systems to keep politicians of all sorts informed, succinctly yet reliably, in timely fashion, about the trends that could require changes in regulations
  • Simulation systems to help politicians of all sorts creatively explore possible new policy frameworks – and to gain a better idea in advance of likely positive and negative consequence of these new ideas
  • Monitoring systems to report objectively on whether regulatory policies are having their desired effect
  • Concentration systems to boost the ability of individual politicians to concentrate on key decisions, and to reach decisions free from adverse tiredness, distraction, bias, or prejudice
  • Encouragement systems to encourage greater positive participation in the political and regulatory processes by people who have a lot to contribute, but who are currently feeling pressure to participate instead in different fields of activity.

One source of ideas, by the way, is the H+Pedia article on “Politics 2.0”.


  1. Chapter updated: “1. Vision and roadmap” Leave a reply
  2. Chapter updated: “4. Work and purpose” Leave a reply
  3. Transpolitica goals and progress, Q1 Leave a reply
  4. The Future of Politics (#T4G17) Leave a reply
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  6. Markets and fundamentalists: chapter ready for review Leave a reply
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